How to Write Pediatric SOAP Notes with Templates & Examples

Updated: November 22, 2023

In the specialized field of pediatric healthcare, documenting a child’s medical and therapeutic journey is crucial. Pediatric SOAP notes play an essential role in this documentation process, offering a structured and effective way to capture vital information. This article explores the intricacies of Pediatric SOAP notes, including their challenges, benefits, and practical examples.

What are Pediatric SOAP Notes?

Pediatric SOAP Notes are a method of documentation used by healthcare professionals to record the details of a child’s medical encounter. SOAP, an acronym for Subjective, Objective, Assessment, and Plan, provides a clear and organized structure for noting crucial aspects of the patient’s status and the treatment plan.

Challenges of Pediatric Notes

Writing SOAP notes for pediatric patients presents unique challenges:

  • Communication Barriers: Young patients may not effectively communicate their symptoms and feelings.
  • Developmental Considerations: Notes must account for the child’s developmental stage, which influences symptoms and treatment responses.
  • Family Dynamics: Pediatric notes often involve input from family members, adding complexity to the subjective information gathered.

Tips for Writing Pediatric SOAP Notes

To effectively write Pediatric SOAP notes, consider the following tips:

  • Engage with Both Child and Caregivers: Gather information from the child as much as possible, but also involve caregivers for a comprehensive view.
  • Be Developmentally Appropriate: Tailor your notes to the child’s age and developmental stage.
  • Observe Non-Verbal Cues: Pay attention to behaviors and non-verbal communication, especially in non-verbal children.

Benefits of Pediatric SOAP Notes

Using SOAP notes in pediatric care offers significant benefits:

  • Structured Documentation: Ensures that all critical aspects of the child’s health are systematically recorded.
  • Improved Communication: Facilitates better communication among healthcare providers.
  • Enhanced Patient Care: Helps in formulating a more accurate and tailored treatment plan for the child.

SOAP Note Template

A Pediatric SOAP Note template typically includes:

SOAP Note Copy Snippet Copied!

Subjective:
– Information reported by the child or caregiver about symptoms, feelings, and concerns.

Objective:
– Observable and measurable data like vital signs, physical exam findings, and test results.

Assessment:
– The healthcare provider’s interpretation of the subjective and objective findings, including diagnosis or identification of issues.

Plan:
– The proposed treatment plan, including medications, therapies, or follow-up requirements.

SOAP Note Examples

Example 1:

Subjective:
10-year-old reports experiencing stomach pains for the last two days. The mother adds that the child has had a loss of appetite and slight nausea, but no vomiting.

Objective:
Abdominal exam shows tenderness in the lower abdomen, no distension or rebound tenderness. Vital signs are normal; no fever present.

Assessment:
Symptoms are suggestive of a possible gastrointestinal upset, possibly due to a mild food-borne illness.

Plan:
Recommend a bland diet and increased fluid intake for the next 24-48 hours. Advise the mother to monitor for any changes, especially the onset of fever or vomiting. Schedule a follow-up call in two days to check on the child’s progress.

Example 2:

Subjective:
A 6-year-old’s teacher reports that the child has been squinting and struggling to read the board in class. The child complains of things looking “blurry.”

Objective:
Vision screening in the office shows reduced visual acuity in the left eye. No signs of eye inflammation or discharge.

Assessment:
The reduced visual acuity in one eye suggests a possible refractive error, such as myopia.

Plan:
Refer to a pediatric ophthalmologist for a comprehensive eye examination. Instruct parents to limit near-vision tasks and encourage outdoor activities. Follow up after the ophthalmologist’s assessment for any additional interventions.

Example 3:

Subjective:
A 4-year-old patient’s father reports that the child has been frequently scratching her ears and seems irritable. The child complains of “ear hurting.”

Objective:
Physical examination reveals redness and fluid buildup in the right ear. No fever is present. The child winces when the ear is gently touched.

Assessment:
The findings suggest a possible middle ear infection, likely otitis media.

Plan:
Prescribe a course of antibiotics suitable for the child’s age and size. Advise the parents to monitor the child’s pain and return if symptoms worsen or do not improve in 48 hours. Recommend over-the-counter pain relief if necessary and schedule a follow-up appointment in one week to reassess the ear condition.

Pediatric SOAP notes are a pivotal tool in ensuring comprehensive and effective care for children. They require thoughtful consideration of the unique challenges presented by pediatric patients, but the structured nature of SOAP notes can significantly aid in overcoming these challenges. With careful crafting, these notes can greatly enhance the quality of pediatric care, ensuring that each child’s health journey is meticulously documented and managed.

Try it for yourself

With TextExpander, you can store and quickly expand full email templates, email addresses, and more anywhere you type. That means you’ll never have to misspell, memorize, or type the same things over and over again.

Subjective: <br>- Information reported by the child or caregiver about symptoms, feelings, and concerns. <br> <br>Objective: <br>- Observable and measurable data like vital signs, physical exam findings, and test results. <br> <br>Assessment: <br>- The healthcare provider’s interpretation of the subjective and objective findings, including diagnosis or identification of issues. <br> <br>Plan: <br>- The proposed treatment plan, including medications, therapies, or follow-up requirements.
Subjective: <br>- 10-year-old reports experiencing stomach pains for the last two days. The mother adds that the child has had a loss of appetite and slight nausea, but no vomiting. <br> <br>Objective: <br>- Abdominal exam shows tenderness in the lower abdomen, no distension or rebound tenderness. Vital signs are normal; no fever present. <br> <br>Assessment: <br>- Symptoms are suggestive of a possible gastrointestinal upset, possibly due to a mild food-borne illness. <br> <br>Plan: <br>- Recommend a bland diet and increased fluid intake for the next 24-48 hours. Advise the mother to monitor for any changes, especially the onset of fever or vomiting. Schedule a follow-up call in two days to check on the child's progress.
Subjective: <br>- A 6-year-old's teacher reports that the child has been squinting and struggling to read the board in class. The child complains of things looking "blurry." <br> <br>Objective: <br>- Vision screening in the office shows reduced visual acuity in the left eye. No signs of eye inflammation or discharge. <br> <br>Assessment: <br>- The reduced visual acuity in one eye suggests a possible refractive error, such as myopia. <br> <br>Plan: <br>- Refer to a pediatric ophthalmologist for a comprehensive eye examination. Instruct parents to limit near-vision tasks and encourage outdoor activities. Follow up after the ophthalmologist’s assessment for any additional interventions.
Subjective: <br>- A 4-year-old patient’s father reports that the child has been frequently scratching her ears and seems irritable. The child complains of "ear hurting." <br> <br>Objective: <br>- Physical examination reveals redness and fluid buildup in the right ear. No fever is present. The child winces when the ear is gently touched. <br> <br>Assessment: <br>- The findings suggest a possible middle ear infection, likely otitis media. <br> <br>Plan: <br>- Prescribe a course of antibiotics suitable for the child’s age and size. Advise the parents to monitor the child’s pain and return if symptoms worsen or do not improve in 48 hours. Recommend over-the-counter pain relief if necessary and schedule a follow-up appointment in one week to reassess the ear condition.

Work smarter.

With TextExpander, you can store and quickly expand snippets anywhere you type. That means you'll never have to misspell, memorize, or type the same things over and over, ever again.

|

Less Repetition, More Customer Delight

TextExpander gives your team the power to do what they do best — faster.